Nuclear Weapons

Sweden has signed the International Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). NPT grants France, China, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States the right to own and maintain nuclear weapons systems to ensure their functioning. With the guidance of Sweden's signing of the non-proliferation agreement, the Council of Ethics assesses that the type of activities that companies from these five countries conduct within the scope of the treaty permits.

Sweden has signed the International Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). NPT grants France, China, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States the right to own and maintain nuclear weapons systems to ensure their functioning. With the guidance of Sweden’s signing of the non-proliferation agreement, the Council of Ethics assesses that the type of activities that companies from these five countries conduct within the scope of the treaty permits.

Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty

The Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is a 1970 treaty aimed at preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons technology and knowledge, giving France, China, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States the right to possess nuclear weapons.

The treaty is signed by 189 states, including Sweden. The signatories thus accept that the five countries maintain and continuously upgrade the nuclear weapons systems, to ensure their functioning.

In addition to non-proliferation, the treaty also deals with disarmament and peaceful use of nuclear power. Article 6 of the Treaty deals with disarmament and calls on all countries that have signed the Treaty to seek nuclear disarmament.